Warning After Razor Blades Found Dumped in Thames

Hundreds discovered on foreshore in the Isleworth area

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Left: Tony Handley, PLA. Right: Jason Davey

Left: Tony Handley, PLA. Right: Jason Davey

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River users are being advised by the Port of London Authority (PLA) to take extra care when using the Thames in west London – after hundreds of lethal razor blades were dumped on the foreshore in the Isleworth area.

A member of the public stumbled upon the lethal litter as schoolchildren were taking part in a school project nearby. Jason Davey, from Berkshire, was walking on the foreshore when he made the grim discovery. He then alerted the PLA.

PLA launch ‘Richmond’ made its way to Isleworth, and after an extensive search, sharp-eyed PLA staff Tony Handley and Nathan Dare managed to collect more than five hundred blades. This haul was recovered from the tidal foreshore area near the pink-coloured former boating pavilion near Church Street in Isleworth.

Jason Davey also used his knowledge of the tidal foreshore area to painstakingly retrieve a further significant amount of blades which had been moved by the tide further along the River.

Tony Handley: “The blades were spread out over some metres of foreshore, and many were already sinking into the mud. We were amazed by the quantity – any one of which could have caused a deep serious injury.”

Jason Davey said: “I couldn’t believe it to be honest. I looked down and saw all these razor blades. I’ve no idea what was going through the mind of whoever did this. At the time a group of schoolchildren were doing some kind of wildlife project there and I had to warn their teacher to keep the kids out of harm’s way.”

Jon Beckett from the PLA said: “We are advising river users and members of the public generally to take extra care when they are near the foreshore of the Thames in this area.

“Although it appears that we’ve collected most of them, some may be hidden in the mud. Because this is a fast flowing tidal river some are no doubt already elsewhere in the river. If anyone finds something as dangerous as this, on or in the river, they should contact the Port of London Authority.”

April 6, 2015